Learn from a professional IELTS instructor with many years' experience in IELTS training and teaching English. It's like being in a real classroom. Download. Scott's English Success is a complete preparation website for students planning to sit for the IELTS exam. We offer an interactive online IELTS study course. This Pin was discovered by Kelly Shop. Discover (and save!) your own Pins on Pinterest.

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    Scott English Success Pdf

    Scott's English Success is the original IELTS Preparation site. Join Our Facebook Group or, Google+ and Get PDF Book, Audio CD, Full. IELTS Practice Tests from Scott's English Success IELTS Practice Tests Success Scott's English Success | | ISBN: N/A | MP3, PDF, DOC. Scott English Success For IELTS Full (Listening-Reading-Speaking-Writing). Scott's English Success For IELTS: Interactive course of instruction covering all .

    Skip to main content. Log In Sign Up. Pradeep Sunder. Because the scope of the task is fairly limited, you can practise extremely similar tasks, which will greatly prepare you for the exam. Practice is the magic word though. There is limited practice available and it's quite expensive. That's why we would recommend you download our practice material. You will get more practice for less money. Task 1 is a letter and you must write at least words. You should spend about 20 minutes out of the hour for task 1.

    Passport to Ielts. Ielts Express Upper Intermediate: Book PDF http: Check Your Vocabulary for Ielts: Key Features of this Title Organised by paper so students know exactly which part of the test is being practised and can choose the part of the test they want to focus on.

    The regular test type exercises are clearly signalled, and give systematic test preparation and practice. Contains supplementary activities, which provide additional practice and can be set for homework. This is an exaggerated example but it shows what I mean. Vocabulary and Sentence Structure This area looks at the your grammar and choice of words. The marker will look whether the right grammar and words are used and whether they are used at the right time in the right place and in the right way.

    Listening 5.pdf

    Most people are predominantly worried about their grammar but, as you can see, grammar is only half of one section of three used to grade your writing. IELTS is much more interested in communication rather than grammatical accuracy. Very often people use no paragraphing and the examiner is faced with a "sea" of writing with no breaks from start to finish.

    For me, the best writings are those where there are paragraphs separated by an empty line and also indented. In this way your ideas are separated clearly. It shows and gives organization to your writing and makes it more readable. Areas to Prepare As I said earlier, Task 1 is the best for preparation.

    Below are some areas for you to consider: 1 Answering the question. As I said above, task fulfilment answering the question is one third of your total mark and it is an area in which everyone should do well. This is often, however, not the case. What you must do is to write a letter, which would fully answer the needs of the problem in a real life situation. Even if you have covered all that the question itself asks, have you included everything in the letter needed to realistically perform its function.

    For example, a question I have seen somewhere gives the candidate the following task: You have some library books that you are unable to return as a member of your family in another city has fallen sick and you have had to go and look after them. Write a letter to the library explaining the situation. Apologize for the inconvenience called and say what you are going to do.

    You should write at least words. Answering the question in a way that will get you a good Task Fulfilment grade needs a number of things for you to do.

    Writing less does not answer the question, which tells you to write at least words. If you write less than words, the examiner marking your paper will give you a maximum of 5 for Task Fulfilment or even less. In this case it asks you to do 3 main things: 1.

    Don't take 1 line to explain about your relative - people who do this often don't make the word limit. Enlarge on what the question tells you. Use your imagination. It must be something fairly serious to make you leave town and you must be the only one possible to look after the relative so go into these things.

    Be realistic as well.

    You're writing to a library and you won't make it too personal. Apologizing won't take up much space but you can still devote a couple of sentences to it. Saying what you are going to do should be a full explanation as well. This involves adding other things to the letter, which it may not ask you for, but without which your letter would not perform its function.

    For this question, it would mean introducing yourself by name, giving your library card membership number, telling the library the titles of the books that you have borrowed, the names of their authors, their library reference numbers, when you borrowed them and when they were due back. Finally, in this question, the situation might involve you getting a fine for the late books so you could ask politely for that to be cancelled due to the circumstances.

    Without this information, the letter wouldn't help the library much in real life and, even though the question doesn't ask you specifically to include it, the examiner reading your work will be looking for such things.

    These are things that are needed to get a 9 for task fulfilment and, theoretically, anyone, whatever their level of English, should be able to get a good mark here. The opening of your letter should reflect which one you are writing. Phillips, Dear Mrs.

    I am writing with regard to I am writing with reference to I am writing in connection with I am writing in response to In reply to your letter, I am writing to EG: Dear John, Hi there!

    IELTS Practice Tests from Scott’s English Success | AOneseries's Blog

    It's been so long since I've heard from you. I hope you are doing well and I hope all you family are doing fine. I'm pretty good in spite of working hard. Anyway, the reason I'm writing is Here I will give you some ideas about some language to use in the substance of the letter which will help you to answer the task well. Asking for Help I would like you to I would be grateful if you could I need to ask your advice about I'd like to ask for information about What I'm looking for is I'm writing to express my anger at I am not happy about I want to know what you are going to do about this situation.

    NB When complaining, don't get too angry. I've had students who really became too heated in their complaints. In a polite semi-formal letter, this should not happen.

    Also, do not over-exaggerate. If it's a reasonably small and understandable problem, do say that you're not satisfied but show that you understand and stay calm in your expressions.

    Thanking I'm very grateful for I'd like to thank you very much for I very much appreciated Please forgive me for I'd like to apologize about Please accept my apologies 5 Ending your Letter First of all, in English we often end letters before the sign off with certain phrases. These can be included in most letters and will make your letter seem realistic and polished.

    For a formal letter, you could use: If you require any further information, please do not hesitate to contact me. Thanking you in advance for your help, I look forward to hearing from you soon.

    For a more informal letter you could use: If you need to know anything else, just get in touch with me as soon as you can. Thanks a lot for your help and I hope to hear from you soon. Be careful though! IELTS examiners quite rightly look for writing that has been memorised and just repeated so, if you use expressions like the ones above, make sure that they fit in with the rest of your letter. Finally you'll need to sign off your letter. For a formal letter use: Yours faithfully, OR Yours sincerely, Remember the commas it makes a good impression on the examiner if you use good punctuation and spell "sincerely" correctly a lot of people don't!

    For an informal letter, love is not always appropriate though English speakers use it a lot. This is not your own work and therefore will be disregarded by the examiner and deducted from the word count.

    You can use individual words but be careful of using "chunks" of the question text. Don't repeat yourself or the same ideas. This gives a bad impression and the examiner realises that it isn't adding to the content of your letter.

    If you are weak at English grammar, try to use short sentences. This allows you to control the grammar and the meaning of your writing much more easily and contributes to a better cohesion and coherence mark.

    It's much easier to make things clear in a foreign language if you keep your sentences short! Think about the tenses of your verbs. If you're writing about something that happened in the past, your verbs will need to be in the past tenses. If you're arranging something in the future, you will need to use the future tenses.

    If it's a habitual action, you'll need the present simple tense and so on. If you have time, a quick check of your verbs at the end of the exam can help you find errors. Check what you have done.

    If you have time after the check, check again. The marker will look whether the right grammar and words are used and whether they are used at the right time in the right place and in the right way.

    Most people are predominantly worried about their grammar but, as you can see, grammar is only half of one section of three used to grade your writing. IELTS is much more interested in communication rather than grammatical accuracy.

    Very often people use no paragraphing and the examiner is faced with a "sea" of writing with no breaks from start to finish. For me, the best writings are those where there are paragraphs separated by an empty line and also indented.

    In this way your ideas are separated clearly. It shows and gives organization to your writing and makes it more readable. Areas to Prepare As I said earlier, Task 1 is the best for preparation. Below are some areas for you to consider: As I said above, task fulfilment answering the question is one third of your total mark and it is an area in which everyone should do well.

    This is often, however, not the case. What you must do is to write a letter, which would fully answer the needs of the problem in a real life situation. Even if you have covered all that the question itself asks, have you included everything in the letter needed to realistically perform its function.

    For example, a question I have seen somewhere gives the candidate the following task: You have some library books that you are unable to return as a member of your family in another city has fallen sick and you have had to go and look after them. Write a letter to the library explaining the situation.

    Apologize for the inconvenience called and say what you are going to do. You should write at least words. Answering the question in a way that will get you a good Task Fulfilment grade needs a number of things for you to do.

    Writing less does not answer the question, which tells you to write at least words. If you write less than words, the examiner marking your paper will give you a maximum of 5 for Task Fulfilment or even less. In this case it asks you to do 3 main things: Don't take 1 line to explain about your relative - people who do this often don't make the word limit.

    Enlarge on what the question tells you. Use your imagination. It must be something fairly serious to make you leave town and you must be the only one possible to look after the relative so go into these things.

    Be realistic as well. You're writing to a library and you won't make it too personal. Apologizing won't take up much space but you can still devote a couple of sentences to it. Saying what you are going to do should be a full explanation as well. This involves adding other things to the letter, which it may not ask you for, but without which your letter would not perform its function. For this question, it would mean introducing yourself by name, giving your library card membership number, telling the library the titles of the books that you have borrowed, the names of their authors, their library reference numbers, when you borrowed them and when they were due back.

    Finally, in this question, the situation might involve you getting a fine for the late books so you could ask politely for that to be cancelled due to the circumstances.

    Without this information, the letter wouldn't help the library much in real life and, even though the question doesn't ask you specifically to include it, the examiner reading your work will be looking for such things.

    Practice Listening Test 5 Test Paper: Do Not Read Until You Begin The Test

    These are things that are needed to get a 9 for task fulfilment and, theoretically, anyone, whatever their level of English, should be able to get a good mark here.

    The opening of your letter should reflect which one you are writing. A friendly letter will open with Dear followed by a name which should then be followed by a comma, eg: Dear Mr.

    Phillips, Dear Mrs. You could use the following to help you: I am writing with regard to I am writing with reference to I am writing in connection with I am writing in response to In reply to your letter, I am writing to Dear John, Hi there! It's been so long since I've heard from you. I hope you are doing well and I hope all you family are doing fine.

    I'm pretty good in spite of working hard. Anyway, the reason I'm writing is Here I will give you some ideas about some language to use in the substance of the letter which will help you to answer the task well. Asking for Help I would like you to I would be grateful if you could I need to ask your advice about I'd like to ask for information about What I'm looking for is I'm writing to express my anger at I am not happy about I want to know what you are going to do about this situation.

    NB When complaining, don't get too angry. I've had students who really became too heated in their complaints. In a polite semi-formal letter, this should not happen. Also, do not over-exaggerate. If it's a reasonably small and understandable problem, do say that you're not satisfied but show that you understand and stay calm in your expressions. Thanking I'm very grateful for I'd like to thank you very much for I very much appreciated Please forgive me for I'd like to apologize about These can be included in most letters and will make your letter seem realistic and polished.

    For a formal letter, you could use: If you require any further information, please do not hesitate to contact me. Thanking you in advance for your help, I look forward to hearing from you soon.

    For a more informal letter you could use: If you need to know anything else, just get in touch with me as soon as you can. Thanks a lot for your help and I hope to hear from you soon. Be careful though! IELTS examiners quite rightly look for writing that has been memorised and just repeated so, if you use expressions like the ones above, make sure that they fit in with the rest of your letter. Finally you'll need to sign off your letter. For a formal letter use: Yours faithfully, OR Yours sincerely, Remember the commas it makes a good impression on the examiner if you use good punctuation and spell "sincerely" correctly a lot of people don't!

    For an informal letter, love is not always appropriate though English speakers use it a lot. Better would be to use: This is not your own work and therefore will be disregarded by the examiner and deducted from the word count. You can use individual words but be careful of using "chunks" of the question text. Don't repeat yourself or the same ideas.

    This gives a bad impression and the examiner realises that it isn't adding to the content of your letter. If you are weak at English grammar, try to use short sentences. This allows you to control the grammar and the meaning of your writing much more easily and contributes to a better cohesion and coherence mark. It's much easier to make things clear in a foreign language if you keep your sentences short!

    Think about the tenses of your verbs. If you're writing about something that happened in the past, your verbs will need to be in the past tenses.

    If you're arranging something in the future, you will need to use the future tenses. If it's a habitual action, you'll need the present simple tense and so on. If you have time, a quick check of your verbs at the end of the exam can help you find errors. Check what you have done. If you have time after the check, check again.

    And so on Don't be irrelevant. Although you can use your imagination to expand on your answer, if any part of your letter is totally unrelated to the question and put in to just put up the word count, then the examiner will not take it into account and deduct it from the word count. If you want to improve, there's no secret. You won't get better sitting and doing nothing. It could make all the difference between your getting the band that you need, and getting half a band less than you need and having to wait 3 months to do the exam again.